The Afternoon Giammattei Unleashed the Fury

If one looks at the images of the attacks on the Congress building last weekend, you can see perpetrators wielding expandable batons, normal police issue crowd control weapons. This, in addition to narratives highlighting state infiltration of the demonstration and lack of police protection to the Congress building itself, should make us think a bit more deeply about state actions.

Ricardo Marroquín and Francisco Rodríguez wrote a piece in Plaza Pública about the events of November 21st, questioning narratives of what happened, both official and unofficial.

The following is from the English translation of the piece published in El Faro English.

The corner of Seventh Avenue and Eighth Street in Zone 1 was the dividing line between the two stages of the November 21 demonstration. One, calm, the other, a clash with police. From the corner between the Cathedral and the Trade Portal, tear gas entered the Plaza de la Constitución several times; the gas was released from the cannisters that the PNC riot police hurled at protesters who wanted to get into the congressional building, but which also stung the eyes of bystanders. Minutes before 3:00 p.m., a small part of that building was set on fire. One question remains in a city that seemed asleep: where did such fury come from?

You can read the full piece, with great photographs by Simone Dalmasso, here, on the El Faro English site, which also has a link to the original Spanish version in Plaza Pública.

Our previous pieces, here and here, provide some context for the outrage (‘indignación’) that has contributed to this.



Categories: Corruption, Culture, Guatemala, Human Rights, Indigenous peoples, Justice, Legal, Poverty, Solidarity in Action, Video

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